Yuletide Joy

Yuletide Blessings, here is the Circle of the Stag December News!

coffee cup spilling beans

Coffee Corner

Thank you to all who attended our November Coffee Connections at Twisted Java!

Our next Coffee Connections will be December 17th at Twisted Java - 2615 W 13th St N, Wichita, KS 67203.

Looking for Something to do?

NOW through DECEMBER 31ST - Illuminations Hosted by Botanica, The Wichita Gardens.
DECEMBER 15TH - A Drag Queen Christmas Hosted by Wichita Orpheum Theatre.
DECEMBER 16TH - Christmas Lights Walk Hosted by Bike Walk Wichita.
DECEMBER 17TH - Coffee Connections Hosted by Circle of the Stag.
DECEMBER 19TH - Pagan Coffee Event for Wichita Pagans and Heathens (WPAH) · Hosted by Ralph Romig.
DECEMBER 31ST - New Year's Eve Hosted by Botanica, The Wichita Gardens.

krampus-mitt-kinder-edited

Krampus (not the movie)

by Colleen

Because what a better way to balance all the happy Santas and Elves then to have a terrifying demon story. I personally love Krampus and I would kill for a Krampus parade here in Wichita (not literally, I'll leave that to Krampus). Here is a tid bit from Wikipedia about Krampus:

"In folklore, Krampus is a horned, anthropomorphic figure described as "half-goat, half-demon", who, during the Christmas season, punishes children who have misbehaved, in contrast with Saint Nicholas, who rewards the well-behaved with gifts. Krampus is one of the companions of Saint Nicholas in several countries including Austria, Bavaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, South Tyrol and parts of Northern Italy. The origin of the figure is unclear; some folklorists and anthropologists have postulated its pre-Christian origin.
In traditional parades and in such events as the Krampuslauf (English: Krampus run), young men dressed as Krampus participate; such events occur annually in most Alpine towns. Krampus is featured on holiday greeting cards called Krampuskarten." Read more here.

Awesome right? Who would love drinking some libation (Homemade mead for me please!), dressing up in costume and scaring the crap out of kids. Sign me up! Ok maybe I'm a little too excited. But I do love hearing about traditions that have been passed down that may not be mainstream and especially ones rooted in Pagan culture. Its interesting to see how Krampus has changed over time and how different religions have influenced this fantastic beast.

Click the box below to watch a National Geographic video of Krampus:
krampus___xmas_card___10_by_brittmartin-d34vq6y

Here are 9 Facts About Krampus, St. Nick's Demonic Companion:

via http://mentalfloss.com/article/71999/9-facts-about-krampus-st-nicks-demonic-companion

"St. Nick brings the gifts, and Krampus brings the pain. Here are some things you might not have known about Santa's demonic companion.

1. KRAMPUS IS A CHRISTMAS DEMON.
Who is Krampus? In Austria and across the German-speaking Alpine region, the demonic character is a crucial part of the holiday season. He’s a devilish figure, with long horns and a goaty beard, much like typical portrayals of Satan. You might see him posed harmlessly on a greeting card or reproduced in chocolates or figurines. But you might also encounter a procession of Krampuses stalking through the town, laden with bells and chains, intimidating onlookers or whipping them with bundles of sticks.

2. DECEMBER 5 BELONGS TO KRAMPUS. IF YOU SURVIVE, YOU MIGHT GET PRESENTS.
December 5 is Krampusnacht, when Krampus reigns. In the real world, people might attend Krampus balls, or young men from the local Krampusgruppe might don carved wooden masks, cowbells, chains, and elaborate costumes to run through town in a Krampuslauf (Krampus run), frightening and sometimes beating bystanders. According to legend, Krampus will spend the night visiting each house. He might leave bundles of sticks for bad children—or he might just hit them with the sticks instead. He might toss them into a sack or basket on his back and then throw it in a stream, or he might straight-up take them to hell.
The next day, though, is Nikolastaug, St. Nicholas' Day—the same St. Nicholas whose Dutch name, Sinterklass, evolved into “Santa Claus.” In other words, it’s time for presents for all the little girls and boys … that is, all the ones who haven’t already been beaten, damned, or drowned.

3. KRAMPUS MAY BE A MONSTER, BUT HE PALS AROUND WITH SANTA.
Originally, Krampus was a purely pagan creation, said to be the son of Hel from Norse mythology. But he got grafted onto Christian tradition as a sidekick of St. Nicholas, similar to figures like Zwarte Piet in the Netherlands and Knecht Ruprecht in Germany. Since the 17th century, the two have been linked in a sort of Christmasy yin-yang, with Krampus as St. Nick’s dark companion. Costumed figures of the two traditionally visit houses and businesses together on Krampusnacht: St. Nick brings the gifts, and Krampus brings the pain.

4. KRAMPUS REVELERS WILL HIT, PUSH, AND WHIP SPECTATORS AT THEIR PARADES.
The Krampus of legend whips people with his birch bundle, but he’s a literal demon. Surely the costumed human Krampus partiers wouldn’t engage in such violence, right? Wrong. Here’s a description of the Salzburg Krampuslauf from a tourist who expected mere costumed buffoonery and came home with welts:

The narrow streets in the Old City section of Salzburg were packed with pedestrians as the Krampusse stomped through. Many people were caught unaware and reacted with terror. Some would flee and try to seek refuge in a shop or restaurant, only to be pursued by a determined Krampus. With so many easy targets, we again managed to escape largely unharmed. At times we were chased, jostled and struck, but compared with the brutality we witnessed, it was obvious we had been spared the full brunt of what Krampus could muster.

This writer went to Krampuslaufs in three cities and described “savage beatings” to people’s thighs and shins, as well as a Krampus chasing down and sitting on a teenager. But despite the fear and bruises, it’s all in good fun, and hey—at least they aim for the legs.

5. THE APPEARANCE OF KRAMPUS VARIES, BUT HE OFTEN HAS ONE HUMAN FOOT AND ONE CLOVEN HOOF.
The Krampus costumes at Krampuslaufs are aesthetically varied—they may be reminiscent of devils, bats, goats, Abominable Snowmen, or something out of a Guillermo del Toro movie. There are usually some kind of horns and hides involved, but there’s also a lot of free rein.
Krampus has also been a fixture on Austrian holiday greeting cards since the 1800s, where he’s shown pursuing women or menacing children. On the cards, Krampus traditionally has a long tongue that sometimes lolls halfway down his chest, and sports one human foot and one cloven hoof—no one is entirely sure why.

6. SOME AUSTRIAN HOUSEHOLDS HAD YEAR-ROUND DÉCOR MEANT TO REMIND KIDS TO STAY GOOD OR KRAMPUS WOULD GET THEM.
A 1958 article about the Krampus legend in Styria (a state in southeast Austria) reports that Krampus would deliver gold-painted bundles of birch sticks to children, small versions of the bundle of twigs he would use to beat people. The families would hang the birch twigs on the wall for the rest of the year as decoration—and to remind kids to stay in line. The article rather primly notes that the twigs are hung “particularly in those houses where the behaviour of the children merits the application of corporal correction.”

7. KRAMPUS WAS ONCE BANNED BY FASCISTS.
Between 1934 and 1938, when Austria was under Fascist rule, Krampus was seen as a symbol of (variously) sin, anti-Christian ideals, and Social Democrats. The newspaper of the Austrian Catholic Union called for a Krampus boycott, and the government of Lienz, the capital of East Tyrol, forbade Krampus dances, and further mandated that all aspiring St. Nicholases must be licensed by the city. They also pledged to arrest Krampus whenever they saw him. Though it didn’t rise to the level of a ban, in 1953 the head of Vienna’s kindergarten system also published a pamphlet calling Krampus “an evil man” and warning parents that celebrating him could scar their children for life.

8. KRAMPUS MASKS ARE VALUABLE PIECES OF FOLK ART.
Sure, you could probably pick up some plastic horns at Tyrolian Target, but that’s not really in the right spirit. Traditionally, the masks worn in a Krampus procession are made of wood, hand-carved by specialist artisans. For instance, Ludwig Schnegg makes the masks for all 80 members of the Haiming Krampusgruppe—and he’s been making them since 1981. Antique masks often wind up in museums; either folklore museums, or ones explicitly devoted to the Krampus. The towns of Kitzbühel and Stallhofen both feature Krampus museums that collect old costumes and masks, and until recently, there was a museum in Suetschach as well.

9. YOU CAN CELEBRATE KRAMPUS EVEN IF YOU'RE IN THE U.S.
Krampus has become increasingly popular on this side of the pond—he's shown up on Venture Brothers, Grimm, Supernatural, The Colbert Report, and American Dad, and there's a Krampus-inspired horror movie. And in an increasing number of American cities, you can go to a Krampus party, Krampus costume contest, or even a traditional Krampuslauf. Los Angeles in particular has a burgeoning Krampus scene, and the Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn hosts a yearly costume party. You can also get down with Krampus in Chicago, D.C., Philadelphia, Richmond, Orlando, and other cities in the U.S. and Canada.
Of course, for some people the holidays are scary enough without throwing a demon beast with a penchant for physical assault into the mix. But if you’re the kind of person who goes to extra-scary haunted houses at Halloween, take heart: That terror doesn’t have to stop just because we’ve entered a season of togetherness and joy."

December Correspondences

christmas-moon-wallpapers-0_0
thH8VY3CVG

Full Moon - December 3rd

Via moongiant.com “The December Full Moon is often referred to as the Full Cold Moon or Moon of the Long Nights Moon. The Zuni Indians referred to this time of the year as "sun has traveled home to rest”. This Decembers Full Moon will also be extra big and bright as it is the last SUPERMOON of 2017. A Supermoon is when the Full Moon happens at the same time as the Moon’s perigee (moon’s closest position to earth in the moons orbit) This combination results in the Moon being a bit bigger and brighter than other times.” Also known as the Snow/Fire/Sagittarius full moon.

December

Birthstone & Flower

There are several birth flowers for December. You have your choice of Holly, Poinsettia, Orchid or Narcissus. The December birthstone, turquoise, is regarded as a love charm. It is also a symbol of good fortune and success, and it is believed to relax the mind and to protect its wearer from harm. Turquoise rings, in particular, are thought to keep away evil spirits.

New Moon - December 18th

Via https://astrologyking.com/new-moon-december-2017/
"The new moon on Monday December 18, 2017 is at 26 degrees Sagittarius. The strongest astrological influence on new moon December 2017 comes from Saturn one side of the new moon and Venus the other. This would normally be a sad and lonely arrangement but Uranus trine the new moon makes it all better.
The December 2017 new moon is good for committing to a serious relationship and for meeting someone to share the rest of your life with. This is a new moon for making positive changes without upsetting the structures and routines in your life. You can have the best of both worlds as you leave your past behind and create your new reality.
.
7e2da44c2932ccc24af564200a0e30bf

Zodiac

via famousbirthdays.com
“The final month of the year is December, as well as the last days of the Fall season. December 21st marks the beginning of Winter with the Winter Solstice, which translates into colder weather and earlier nights. With the closing of the year, December holds many of the world's most-loved traditions, including Yule, Christmas, Hanukkah and New Year's Eve. Additionally, for those who are amongst our world greatest thinkers and doers, December also marks the time when Nobel Prize winners are awarded.

The two signs associated with the month of November are Sagittarius and Capricorn. For those born from December 1st to December 21st, they are members of the Sagittarius sign. The Sagittarius can be sure to have a desire to put their imprint in the world, which is paired nicely with their appreciation of life's finer things. People born from December 22nd to December 31st are members of the Capricorn zodiac sign. One of the life's natural intellectuals, the Capricorn can be identified by their curiosity and originality.”

December Dates and Events

12/6 Mindfulness Day – Zen Buddhist day for mindfully seeing and acting with compassion for the poor and oppressed.
12/7-12/9 Feast of the Immanent Feminine Divine Spirit – Honoring Goddess as Maha Devi Shakti (Hindu)
12/17 Saturnalia/Opalia
12/21 16:28 Winter Solstice
12/22 Yule Feast

The Wheel of the Year ever turns, and as we approach the longest night of the year the Oak King prepares to conquer the Holly King. Yule is approaching, and with it comes the return of the sun. “The sun returns! The light returns! The earth begins to warm once more! The time of darkness has passed, and a path of light begins the new day. Welcome, welcome, the heat of the sun, blessing us all with its rays.” (Thoughtco.com)
merry-winter-solstice

Around the Spiral Tree

  • High Priestess Duvessa Sarrat-Irkalli from Covenant of the Moon completed her Death Midwifery Certificate.
  • The North Dakota Covens are all getting together for a Yule gathering.
  • Circle of the Stag will be having their annual Winter Solstice Retreat.
STT Logo
quote-the-winter-solstice-has-always-been-special-to-me-as-a-barren-darkness-that-gives-birth-gary-zukav-32-55-91
Circle of the Stag
Wichita, Kansas
MailPoet